Category: News

Nashville musician encourages consumers to shop local

Nashville musician encourages consumers to shop local

 

NASHVILLE, Ind.Brown County musician and software consultant Chuck Wills encourages consumers to shop local this holiday season and throughout the year.

Wills says he shops at small businesses in his community all year round, but his family and friends have come to expect unique holiday gifts from the arts and crafts mecca of Brown County, Ind. Whether it’s for those gifts or just items he needs, he supports the local economy and encourages others to do the same by shopping local.

Wills adds, though, that supporting small, local businesses doesn’t just mean purchasing an item. He says buying tickets to an event or planning an evening out together is not only good for the musicians and performing artists people see, but also enhances one’s time with others.

Non-profit focuses on harm reduction for IV drug users

Non-profit focuses on harm reduction for IV drug users

 

NOTE: This is Part 1 of a profile on Indiana Recovery Alliance. The second segment will be part of a larger special feature on the impact of heroin use on social and community services in Indiana. The full package will be published in upcoming months.

 

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Social worker Chris Abert started a non-profit outreach service to help those at risk for disease and death due to intravenous drug use. With heroin use and HIV diagnoses in Indiana reaching epidemic proportion, his agency has grown from three to more than 60 volunteers.

The Indiana Recovery Alliance focuses on harm reduction in whatever manner the person deems necessary. Abert said volunteers meet people where they are and focus on facilitating any positive change as people want for themselves.

That can manifest itself in many different ways.

Abert says that positive impact can range from abstinence to clean needles to condoms. It also means that Indiana Recovery Alliance will provide people with clothes, rugs to use as sleeping mats, shoes, sanitary napkins and many other necessities that help them continue to feel human.

Once a week, IRA volunteers climb in their long, silver van and go out to meet people and provide for their needs. The Chicago Recovery Alliance sold the van to IRA for $1, which the agency still owes, because, Abert said, “We don’t have a dollar.”

With the heroin and HIV epidemic that exploded this spring, Abert said his volunteer numbers have increased, but what the agency needs more than anything are monetary donations. For those who would like to donate money, go to IRA’s Facebook page or website at indianarecoveryalliance.org.

If you’d like to donate something, but don’t have money to spare, Abert said IRA could use medical or other supplies distributed or used when the van goes out in the community.

Another way to help, he said, would be for churches or other organizations to host coat drives. IRA distributes the coats to those exposed to inclement and winter weather.

Here’s an introduction to the Indiana Recovery Alliance:

Chris Abert talks about harm reduction and The Indiana Recovery Alliance.
(Video by Linda Margison)

Daughter shares memory of mom at Alzheimer’s walk

Daughter shares memory of mom at Alzheimer’s walk

 

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — Fort Wayne resident Delana Etnyre joined 19 other family members Saturday, Oct. 10, to honor her mother, Verna Bates, at the Walk to End Alzheimer’s.

It was the 14th anniversary of Bates’s death.

After the event, Etnyre shared a memory about Hershey’s candy bars and how they became a shared private moment between her and her mother. She said the memory “is close to my heart, because it starts when I was very young and ends when she was very old.”

Her niece, Loretta Fox, said she raises money and walks each year for the Alzheimer’s Association, “because [Granny] was my best friend, and I do it for her… so she always knows I remember her.”

Fox also shared a memory about her granny.

 

For more information on the Alzheimer’s Association, visit www.alz.org or call (800) 272-3900.

Habitat raises funds, and then walls, to get family in home by the holidays

Habitat raises funds, and then walls, to get family in home by the holidays

 

SEE ALSO: Volunteer works so partner families have homes

 

PEOGA, Ind. — After two fundraisers in the past few months, Brown County Habitat for Humanity is ready to raise the walls on this year’s partner family home.

On Tuesday, Oct. 6, workers will frame the walls on this three-bedroom house for Nathaniel and Rachelle Nash and their three children, Desirea, Jordan and Nate.

The plan is to have the family moved in by the end of November, so the Nashes’ home church, Church of the Lakes in Cordry-Sweetwater, plans to step in to provide labor and food for the volunteers, according to Rachelle Nash.

Sandie Jones, a Habitat board member, said the organization’s inaugural garage sale in August raised $4,891 and the Hike for Humanity on Sept. 26 brought in $6,400.

“It was a great event with 50 hikers participating,” Jones wrote in a message.

The money raised will fund the no-interest loan that the Nashes will pay back over time, according to Rachelle Nash.

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